Mark Milliman is a Principal Consultant at Inphotonics Research driving the adoption and assisting local governments to plan, build, operate, and lease access open-access municipal broadband networks. Additionally, he works with entrepreneurs and venture capitalists to increase the value of their intellectual capital through the creation of strategic product plans and execution of innovative marketing strategies. With more than 22 years of experience in the telecommunications industry that began at AT&T Bell Laboratories, Mark has built fiber, cable, and wireless networks around the world to deliver voice, video, and data services. His thorough knowledge of all aspects of service delivery from content creation to the design, operation, and management of the network is utilized by carriers and equipment manufacturers. Mark conceived and developed one of the industry's first multi-service provisioning platform and is multiple patent holder. He is active in the IEEE as a senior member. Mark received his B.S. in Electrical Engineering from Iowa State University and M.S. in Electrical Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University.

Qwest Merger Prompts Concern

Kirk Siegler (2010-04-22)
DENVER, CO (KUNC) – Colorado political and business leaders worry the looming merger of Qwest Communications with Louisiana-based CenturyLink will be bad news for the state’s economy. Governor Bill Ritter, senators Mark Udall and Michael Bennet are expressing concerns about what the merger could mean for expanding broadband access to rural areas. And as KUNC’s Kirk Siegler reports, economists predict they’re could be a sizable trickle-down effect once the headquarters is moved. © Copyright 2010, KUNC

Rural Communities Still Lacking High Speed Internet

Brian Larson / Jeff Nuttall (2010-04-22)
GREELEY, CO (KUNC) – Even in the 21st Century high-speed internet service is not a given in many parts of the state. But several groups are hoping to tap into federal stimulus money to fill in the gaps. KUNC’s Brian Larson spoke to Northern Colorado Business Report Publisher Jeff Nuttall about what’s driving the competition. © Copyright 2010, KUNC

Google Invites AT&T, Comcast, Verizon To Fiber Party

Whenever they actually get a network built…
04:15PM Thursday Apr 22 2010 by Karl Bode

We already knew that Google’s plan to deploy 1 Gbps fiber to the home to a limited area was going to operate as a wholesale operation — with open access allowing ISPs to come in and compete on top of the network (whenever it’s finally built). Part of the reason Google’s deploying the network is so they can show how open access and competition can help keep prices down, service quality up and carriers on their best behavior. The company this week reiterated their dedication to open access, inviting companies like Comcast and AT&T to offer service over the network when it’s finally built:

ITU’s amazing facts: broadband prices drop like a stone

Posted By TelecomTV One , 20 April 2010 | 0 Comments | (0)
The ITU today released a miscellany of telecoms facts and figures that seem to show a telecoms and ICT industry in rude health, despite coming through a gut-churning recession. We’re obviously getting good at weathering them. By Ian Scales.

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UTOPIA network is worth new bonds to foster Utah growth

By Mike Winder

Published: Sunday, April 18, 2010 12:04 a.m. MDT

I was not an elected official when my city committed to the Utah Telecommunication Open Infrastructure Agency (UTOPIA). But now as mayor of the largest UTOPIA city, I find that what to do with our city’s network has become one of the greatest challenges I face — not just because of West Valley City’s enormous commitment ($147 million between 2010 and 2040), but importantly because of the enormous potential benefits. I find the question is not, “Was UTOPIA a good idea or a bad idea?” The question is: “Looking at our hand today, what is our best way forward?”

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