Brigham City hears from UTOPIA

The sponsoring cities and UTOPIA have the right concept.  UTOPIA is now being better managed, and the network penetration is increasing.  I know that they can start meeting their objectives and eventually be profitable, but their members need to continue to invest in them.  The $54,000 that the city of Brigham needs to contribute to keep UTOPIA going is a small price to pay for the economic and consumer benefits the network brings.  I’ve seen cities blow that much money on studies that are never implemented and just sit on a shelf.   I hope Brigham residents and the council have the foresight to continue investing in this valuable asset.

By Nancy B. Fuller (Standard-Examiner correspondent)

BRIGHAM CITY — After months of rumors, the Brigham City Council had its first formal meeting with UTOPIA executive directors on options for implementation and long-term commitments for the city to continue with the fiber-optic network.

The meeting was held one hour before the regular city council meeting, which didn’t leave enough time for council members to address their concerns, so the council requested another meeting with UTOPIA.

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Inside Google’s Ultra-High-Speed Plans

How The Online Giant’s Fiber Project Could Change The Future Of Internet Access

As the scrutiny intensifies over the United States’ inability to keep up with the broadband efforts of other countries, a potential savior has emerged. With its upcoming Fiber For Communities project, Google will deliver Internet connections of more than 1Gbps to one or more trial communities, in turn spawning hope across the rest of the country that ultra-fast broadband could soon be a reality for almost everyone.

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UTOPIA network is worth new bonds to foster Utah growth

By Mike Winder

Published: Sunday, April 18, 2010 12:04 a.m. MDT

I was not an elected official when my city committed to the Utah Telecommunication Open Infrastructure Agency (UTOPIA). But now as mayor of the largest UTOPIA city, I find that what to do with our city’s network has become one of the greatest challenges I face — not just because of West Valley City’s enormous commitment ($147 million between 2010 and 2040), but importantly because of the enormous potential benefits. I find the question is not, “Was UTOPIA a good idea or a bad idea?” The question is: “Looking at our hand today, what is our best way forward?”

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